Generate Business Domain Name Ideas That Give You a Competitive Edge

Have you ever noticed that some businesses have these epic names that make it easy for them to market and go viral? You can’t choose a name at random and hope for that kind of success. You need to be careful about the selection process. By generating ideas that give you a competitive edge, the name does the marketing for you.

So, how do you come up with business domain name ideas that help you compete? It’s all about knowing what to look for in a name. These tips will help you separate the good ideas from the bad ones.

Don’t Spell Words Wrong

You might be desperate to find a domain name that isn’t already taken. In your desperation, you may decide to spell a word wrong. It looks cute, right? There are a few big problems with spelling words wrong:

  1. People may not realize that you did it on purpose.
  2. People will try to spell the word correctly.
  3. Your domain name will auto-correct in various places when you type it out.
  4. You’ll always have to spell it out so that it isn’t typed wrong.

With so many problems, there is no situation where it makes sense for you to spell a word wrong. If you choose to spell it wrong anyway, you may find that search engine optimization becomes a nightmare – and you may end up sending a significant amount of business to the competition. This alone should scare you straight. There’s no reason why you have to spell words wrong just to nab a great domain.

Don’t Limit Yourself

Sure, you might be small now. What about in a year or five years? You don’t want to choose a business domain name that limits you from growing. This means that you have to be cautious with using specific products or services in the name – or even cities. If you expand, you don’t want to have to go through a rebranding. You also don’t want to confuse your audience.

If you’re going to put what it is that you do in the business name, think big. Why limit yourself to cupcakes when you offer other baked goods, too? Why limit yourself to repairs when you do renovations and new builds, too? Regardless of the industry that you’re in, you will offer more than one product or service – and if you limit yourself in your name, you’ll limit yourself in your client base at the same time.

Explore Domain Extensions

Why should the early adopters of the .com extension get all the fun? Too many people want to claim that you need that extension in a domain name. Why? 100 million websites are already using it, so it’s going to be hard to find a winning name if you stay committed to a .com website. Go with something new and memorable, like .ONLINE. It allows you to find a domain that fits your brand. Plus, the word ‘online’ is easy to spell and recognizable in a wide array of languages.

 

I created two for clients which are unique and match their business

Tax Consultancy uses .tax (www.baucher.tax)

Podcast uses .chat (www.rowing.chat)

Brainstorm Some Keywords

It’s important to get some ideas onto a piece of paper or a dry erase board. By brainstorming, you can be more fluid about the ideas that pop up. This is not the time to censor your thoughts. No idea is a bad idea…at least not yet.

Think about breaking out the thesaurus. Throw in an adjective. See what the competition is doing. Remember, there are no hard and fast rules about business domain name ideas. When you can do some brainstorming, you can contribute to a list of possibilities.

Don’t be afraid to involve others in the brainstorming, too. What do your friends have to say? Take it to social media and let others weigh in on the ideas. You may even want to make it a contest. Ask for people to throw out some ideas – and if you use one of their ideas, reward them with what it is that your brand has to offer.

Generate Something Unique

When it comes down to your business domain name, you need something unique. If it sounds like every other business in town (or within your industry), it’s going to be hard for you to stand out. Take a look at some of the most successful businesses out there – they have a name that allows them to hold their own. People remember it because it’s a great name.

While you may have to do some marketing to gain your competitive edge, you don’t want to have to work harder than necessary. If a name has nothing to do with what you sell or you have chosen to make the words hard to spell (or hard to say or hard to write out), it’s going to be a constant effort to market yourself.

The best business domain name ideas are ones that are instantly memorable. Once you happen upon a winner, you’ll know it.

good better best, tin cans

Is all marketing lying?

The advertising industry has a reputation in some quarters as a bunch of liars.
And I hate marketers being tarnished by association.

Advertising is not Marketing

Well advertising is not ALL of marketing: it is a part of marketing.
Good marketing offers products to prospects with robust positioning and offers features and benefits.
The psychology of how to present your pitch is deeply studied and understood.
And you can choose to lie or tell the truth or part of the truth, or a slanted version of the truth, backed by statistics, or dodgy arithmetic or you can choose not to do this.
Marketing does not have to be this way.
Let me introduce empathy into the marketing mix.

Prompts around brand positioning

In marketing messaging there are two big issues which the well-informed marketer and consumer needs to understand before they made the purchase decision

  1. The problem of manipulation. Sales copy that gets the customer to do something they later regret. But if they knew what you knew would they still buy?
  2. The problem of “better”. We are taught that there’s only one answer to this – that a cashmere sweater is better than a fleece; a Rolls Royce is better than a Nissan. but better is not linear and not necessarily accurate because people actually make decisions on axes not on linearity.

How can we take a robust and honest assessment of our brand positioning and add empathy into the mix in order to facilitate prospect buying decisions that are not manipulation and are not [always] about a linear scale of betterment?

What does the customer do and why?

When you make a product purchase decision and I made a different decision, remember it’s possible the you are right and I am wrong in my purchase decision.

Reading the Board of Innovation article about what matters when pressing consumers to adopt sustainable products, the decision drivers are how your product makes ME feel; and how I think your product makes OTHERS feel about me.

Two drivers, two different motivations and both are under pressure from modern lifestyles and constrained budgets.

But actually I think this dual analysis is misplaced.

A linear product decision is incorrect

Representing decisions in a branched “decision tree” is not how the real world works. Individuals’ value systems affect how they choose between brands. If status doesn’t matter to me, your cashmere sweater brand offer is not going to stand up to scrutiny for me. And if I’m worth it matters a lot, then my choice is made regardless of the brand positioning of a substitutable product.

You are the marketer – don’t lie

Another consumer is not you and they don’t think like you think and know what you know.

This is why empathy is such a giant challenge to marketers.

If you genuinely know your brand and product set, you are at an immense advantage.

If you genuinely know your customer persona, you are at an immense advantage.

Merge these two and what do you get?

Axis of purchase decisions

We make our value judgements on a scale. It’s not black and white, on or off. There’s a gradient of choices.

And so let’s consider the how does a brand make you feel – saying it’s ‘better’ does little for your self-appraisal. It may do something if you are more motivated by what others think of you. BUT if their values differ from your own, the result may not be what you hope.

Our brand choices are not in a single direction (linear) nor are they along a single axis.

We make our decisions on at least 2 axes – like a graph. It might be price and convenience, or environmental impact and design.

And so lets re-assess whether all marketing is lying.

Marketing as a service

We as marketers offer you, the consumer, a service.  We can make an assertion about a choice which you might want to make.

We can help busy people to see that there’s a product which is an alternative to what they have bought or previously chosen.

This is neither manipulation, nor lying and it’s not on the good/better/best axis either.

As marketers (and copywriters) we can know and understand our product and our ideal customer really well. And by empathising with prospects we can position products appropriately to appeal to the audience who will value our marketing service. Our descriptions, videos, explanations and photography of the product are a service to the customer.  We offer a new choice which has resonance and meaning on the axes which matter to them.

Can you put your hand on your heart and say your brand does this?

water data visualisation

Marketing perception versus reality

I love my profession. Marketers come in all stripes and sizes. Some are shysters and others are hard graft honest workers.

We use a lot of techniques to advantage the brands we are working for. Some are sly and dishonest and others are honourable.

And today I am focusing on two different ways to influence the customer’s perception versus the reality.

Pricing perception & reality

You may know that there is a “Left Digit Bias” which is well documented in the psychology literature.

This means when we read a price, the numbers before the decimal point get more attention from us than those to the right. And so if a price is slightly below a threshold number like $29.99 as opposed to $30.00 our perception of good or best value goes with the lower left hand number, 29 in this case.

Marketers advise on pricing. And it’s worth reading this recent research about when to use the left digit bias tactic and when not to use it.

If your product is normally priced $2.00 and your net margin is 9% and the price is lowered to $1.99 the net margin drops to 6%. That’s a lot of profit left on the table just for one cent of discount.

A better tactic is to show the Before and Now price. So the relative prices are known by the consumer.

By playing with the pricing you can advance a marketing perception which is less obvious than the reality and which delivers a better outcome for your client brand’s profitability.

Data visualisation perception & reality

I have a tiny obsession at the moment with water. We have a local hose pipe ban – it’s the middle of winter and has been

water data visualisation

Auckland Watercare data

raining heavily most days this month. So why the ban?

I investigated and found the local water company publishes daily updates on the water level in local dams, the volume of water consumed per week and the weekly rainfall compared to the long term mean.

We are currently at 64.95% water storage compared to a historical average level of 88.77% at this time of year. And they illustrate this in a handy graphic, updated daily.

Now I know why there’s a hosepipe ban.

Marketers could use images and data visualisations more often. They offer an easy way to explain things quickly to your customers and prospects.

Geeking out on data summaries isn’t everyone’s hobby of choice. Yet I was drawn into a very detailed analysis of what “good” actually looks like in data visualisation and ways to use this to advance your marketing reality compared to customer perception.

Define good data imagery

Avinash is a data geek – he works for Google. And he shares his expertise in a wonderful weekly email.

Here is a comparison of 4 data visualisations about Covid19. Timely, yes – and each trying to convey a lot of information to the public about what is and is not “safe” to do.

Which of these 4 do you prefer? Which can you ‘understand’ fastest? What is each trying to explain?

Is there a perception and reality gap in these four images? Which is best at showing Covid19 risk?

Avinash Kaushik data visualisation

Comparisons of 4 data visualisations for Covid19

Avinash writes a detailed analysis of his personal scoring system to appraise each image against 8 criteria.

He creates a weighted scoring for each so that a total score is out of 66.

The scoring is on a three point scale “Perfect” scores 3; “Could be optimised” scores 1 and “Reboot” scores minus -2. As you can see the weighting he applies rewards perfect far more than the midlevel score. But hey, that’s his choice. When you do well your score easily out-strips the others.

Which image got which score? [ For answers scroll down.]

  • 23
  • 7
  • 50
  • 64

How were they so different? Isn’t Avinash’s judgement seriously wrong? They all look great to me.

First understand the qualities he is seeking to appraise.

  1. Time to the most important insight.
  2. The effort to understand the whole graphic.
  3. Trust marks.
  4. Rank-ordering of key messages.
  5. Explaining the key logic powering the graphic.
  6. Exposing nuance.
  7. Visualizer trying to be too clever.
  8. Likely to recommend to influential leaders.

And now we can better understand the relative effectiveness of the designs against these criteria.

Read the full article – warning, it’s 6000 words long.

[Scoring – list top left, top right, bottom left, bottom right.]

Copywrite a marketing brief

Briefing is everything.

If you ask the right questions you get the brief right. Then you’re most likely to get the best answer / output to suit your goals.

Knowing your success criteria and metrics are important and also defining what ‘success’ looks like. This is a great methodology of writing the brief from the end back to the beginning.  Try writing the ‘conclusion’ statement as your opening paragraph.

We need customers to understand a Covid19 activity risk matrix. We will have succeeded if fewer people undertake risky activities as measured by…..

One of the things I admire about Avinash is his consistent support for people in the same line of work – how to impress your boss is a key theme. Hence item 8 on his list above.

As a marketer, it really MATTERS that you get noticed for doing good work. Learning some of these things I’m writing about could help your career.

  • Do good marketing
  • Get noticed
  • Get the next job / pay rise / promotion you deserve

If you would like to know how I would copywrite a marketing brief for this job – just email me. Happy to share.

 

objectives and key results

Tips on Getting Things Done

Getting things done is the difference between the successful and the rest.

objectives and key results

Book on Objectives and Key Results

I like to prioritise tasks for myself on a grid or importance and urgency – but this is just a short term day task management tool.  If you have big projects that will achieve your goals, you need a better system.

A workable workflow

Introducing OKRs – Objectives and Key Results – a toolset that will help you align focus, engagement and get the team aligned.

Working within a team is challenging because each person can contribute massively as either an accelerant or a brake on progress.

I’m a rower and the sport of rowing is often used as a metaphor for workplace teamwork. The lessons I learned from sport carry through into my working life. I’ve enjoyed hiring sportspeople because they understand many of these techniques already.

Pick a toolset that works

Rebecca’s rowing business Faster Masters Rowing

Having a hierarchy of tools helps you both in the day to day and also in the longer term. The bigger a project the easier it is to lose focus and direction as you dive into detail, it’s hard to see the bigger picture of your overall progress…. or lack.

An important feature of OKRs is pacing. Setting the speed of work that is manageable.

This book explains what OKRs are and also a detailed example of ways to set them up which you can copy in your business.

Now, get going…!

 

Rose and thorne, bra donation, essential workers, Covid19, Lockdown marketing,

Brand repositioning post-Covid19

Are you trying to understand how your marketing needs to change?

This article sets out the themes which you can use in your own firm to help discern the new rules, the new landscape and the new markets we are now trading in.

The new marketing reality

Nothing is clear.  This is obvious.

But that’s hardly helpful for us marketing people who need to keep on creating campaigns, keep on filling funnels and keep on pushing our recovery efforts after lockdown.

Signs are emerging about what consumers are interested in and where they will look favourably on brands.

I am regularly scanning the world looking for examples and inspiration of what can be done and how you can do it for your brand.

What consumers value

Top home-stay business Look After Me surveyed their audiences and found a distinct shift in sentiment.

Instead of favouring flying on holiday, most now prefer car travel; most prefer to book with local companies to “keep money in the NZ economy”, and most now prioritise accommodation “cleanliness” over price, comfort and wifi provision.

Financial and economic news website, Interest.co.nz asked its readers what they value.  The answers were clear from the start – every single segment of reader who was surveyed came back with similar views.  Two quotes suffice

Your people have a better understanding of fringe issues, more reliably, than any other NZ news outlet. Your reporting on these peripheral matters shows incredible strength. And that makes the world better.

With the woeful quality of NZ journalism it’s my only trusted source of financial news.

ACTION: do a survey now

Understand the new priorities

Clues about the new priorities can be found from a range of commentators.  Some have been “banging this drum” for a while, others are interpreting new data.

I look to global trends as well as industry-specific experts when trying to find a pattern worth following.

Mark Carney, Central Banker, says the “The economy must yield to human values“.  By this I interpret that people matter over profit and that the capitalist model of pursuing profit over all other goals is being challenged.

Retail specialist Mary Portas calls it the “Kindness Economy”.

She realised that kindness isn’t weak but strong: a foundation from which to grow a business that has truth, integrity, longevity and commerciality. As we move away from a time of rabid consumerism and ‘peak stuff,’ Mary believes we are entering a new type of economy. One built on kindness and a Triple Bottom Line: people, planet and profit – in that order. And business who organise themselves around this kinder way of behaving, will be the ones that win.

And Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist, interprets apparently polarising reactions to the same situation in terms of “moral intuitions and values”. In this way, relaxing lockdown provokes both protests against restriction of liberty from social distancing and protests about growing exposure to harm by going back to work. Both can be understood from underlying moral values.

In the context of Brexit and the lockdown, he found

Remainers placed more emphasis on the value of care and the need to minimise harm, whereas leavers placed more emphasis on the value of personal liberty. When evaluating an action or a policy, remainers would ask “will this cause harm?”, whereas leavers would be inclined to ask “will something restrict our freedom?”.

The moral values of your brand now matter.  The alignment and prioritisation of your internal teams across departments will be different now. Your emphasis on the planetary community needs to be interpreted into both the bottom line and operational mores.

ACTION: Review your CRM and sales / marketing alignment

What will “value” mean?

This is tough and will definitely evolve as fear of infection subsides and rises with waves of the pandemic.  In New Zealand now we are feeling relatively safe – lockdown is in Level 2 and we are back at school and work.  Compare our situation to Brazil or New York and value will be very different.

Here are some themes which may emerge – to what extent does your brand and business subscribe to these?

  • Local resilience > global efficiency
  • High corporate debt > riskiness of underlying equity
  • Will the state continue to be engaged within private commerce?
  • Is resilience > risk now?
  • How are tail risks managed?
  • We all understand the fear of unemployment now.
  • The price of everything = the value of everything, including global heating.
  • Economic dynamism and efficiency ≠ solidarity, fairness, responsibility and compassion
What is the new Maslow hierarchy?

Values and needs are realigning.

Now that we fully realise the deep inter-dependency of our global community, will this change our prioritisation about health, wellbeing, global supply chains and personal independence (doing what I want) compared to communal dependence (doing what WE need)?

Can we learn to trust experts again?

Will our approach to climate change (surely the biggest existential threat to our way of life) be adjusted to reflect these new values and to form a new consensus on priorities compared to risks?

What did your company do during Covid-19?

Writing the history of this period can wait for now.

Yet I am certain that the judgements will fall on brands and the public perception of where they were before and after the emergency passes will be based on “people” outcomes not “profit” outcomes.

I bet Greg Foran wishes he was still at Walmart and hiring thousands of new workers rather than at Air New Zealand and laying them off.

This will have the resonance of “what did you do in the War?” and whether you judge the outcome to be “good” or “bad” will depend to a large part on the consumer’s view of whether you were a hoarder or a generous giver; whether you laid off staff, furloughed or retained staff; whether you hoarded resources or paid over the odds to acquire over others or whether you generously supported others.

Adjust brand positioning

Once you know what values your consumers now have you can start customisation to respond to this new priority.

Rose and thorne, bra donation, essential workers, Covid19, Lockdown marketing,

Rose and Thorne donate bras to essential workers

Some of these will be short-term and related to Covid19 and Lockdown – like Rose and Thorne’s Gift-a-Bra to an essential worker.

How important are these people? Very.  How much do we value them?  A lot.  And how many do we know? Lots.

This is great marketing because it is a classic member-get-member programme aligned to the issue of the day.

theme holiday, covid19, marketing in lockdown,

Brand repositioning post-Covid19

 

Look After Me have taken a lead by redesigning holidays into packages that theme around hobbies and interests, that are local and have quality marks for locally owned businesses with high cleanliness scores.

Smart.  Easy to understand.  Aligned.

There’s a Recession too

And of course the recession is already creating new winners and losers.  Take a browse through the Emergency Business Forum questions business owners are asking and their own perceptions of “need” and the consistent themes emerge

  • growth of online ecommerce or at a minimum a website
  • how do we reach our customers
  • fresh marketing ideas
  • finding distributors and stockists
  • learning about digital media
  • how to get customers to switch to online
  • why word of mouth doesn’t cut it any more
  • migrating from in person to online
  • starting a customer database

Part of me groans when reading these; part of me rejoices.

Blending the practical with the strategic is going to be critical in giving quality guidance and up-skilling.  Yet the problem lies as much with medium as small businesses.  Speedy decision making is easy for the owner-operator and will not be so easy to apply to enterprise.

 

Sales funnel, B2B sales, B2B marketing expert

Tips for manufacturers to grow client base

My company provides mechanical designs and manufacturers and supplies products to a few companies in both the US and Europe. How do I increase my customers?

This is a typical “opening” question that I get asked when starting a new engagement with clients.  B2B marketing needs to be closely integrated with the new business and new client acquisition process to be effective.

For a public question and answer, I gave some straightforward answers.  The detail of how to apply these, is where my expertise will help you get it right first time.

Sales funnel, B2B sales, B2B marketing expert

Planning B2B sales and marketing plan

Step one for B2B sales

  1. Ask your existing client/s for referrals. If they were happy with the work that you did, they should be happy to help. If you feel the need, offer them a X%/$X discount on the next project for every client they refer. This is ‘win-win-win’ situation because you get more clients, they get a discount, and they use your services again.
  2. Ask your existing clients for a written recommendation & permission to use their logo on your website. Publish them both on your website. This will help increase the conversion rate on your website. If you feel the need, you can offer them a link to their website which will be good for both of your SEO rankings – so another win-win.
  3. Publish as much (relevant and quality) content as possible on your website (about the projects you’ve done, potential projects, your fields of expertise, etc. Obviously, you need to have a professional and trustworthy looking website. I can explain how the articles need to be done.
  4. Create a free ‘get a quote tool’ – many customers check online to get an estimate of how much the project will cost. If you have an automatic online tool, this can attract a lot of customers. I have personally used such a tool and I was very impressed.
  5. Partner with organisations/companies that work with your target clients – for example: I work with lots of entrepreneurs and many of them ask me for referrals to various types of service providers, including programming companies. These companies give me a small percentage of the profits they make from my referrals (of course I only refer to companies which I know and trust as my reputation is worth more than the referral fee).

Step 2 tactics for more sophisticated marketers

In Europe, there are a number of partnership sites for B2B. You could use these sites to post your offer or search for other offers and hopefully make a match.

Another approach is considering hiring local distributors who specialise in your industry. The advantage here is local distributors will already have a strong network to promote your products/services. Furthermore, local distributors would have thorough understanding of the local market, language, and business culture to close deals.

Go talk to your current customers. Ask them why they do business with you. They may, and most likely will, tell you something different than you’re saying to new prospects. Listen to what your current customers are saying and use their messaging to talk to the market. Ask them if they know other companies that could use what you have,

Go and join the professional trade bodies who represent the industries for your existing clients. Ask your existing clients what these are. Once you are a member, you will be able to see a membership list of other organisations who are also members
Plan outbound marketing to approach these companies and see if they want to also work with you.

Consider visiting the annual conferences and trade shows which these professional bodies run because you will then meet in person with prospects. Many people find it easier to sell their expertise face to face. You could consider doing a trade show stand as well where you can display your past work and the logos of your clients. This builds trust and can start discussions.,

B2B sales and marketing work together

In summary – you need to learn the process of B2B new business, you need a strategy for your new business development and then you need a regular tactical execution process to deliver the new business programme.

You may choose to hire an external advisor to help write the strategy, you could get an in-house salesperson to deliver the tactical execution as well, depending on the size of your contracts and how many you need to get in order to pay for their salary plus commission to make it worthwhile for the business.

Rebecca Caroe B2B marketing speaker

Is B2B marketing yielding good returns?

Is the marketing you are doing giving you the yield you seek?

I am asking this question a LOT at the moment.  I  ask it to myself, for my own businesses, I ask clients, I ask prospects.

One answer came from a professional services marketer.  It serves as a good example for in-house marketers to challenge their thinking, to up-skill and to get insight from beyond the internal team in the business.

This is what she wrote  to answer

Hmmm… It’s hard to tell. I cannot know if a speaking engagement got someone interested enough to ask their consultant to investigate our solutions and eventually get in touch with us and 2 years later… we have a deal signed. It is a complex process to sell our service.

Is a long sales cycle a B2B marketing problem?

Yes, it certainly is.  Tracking and managing a diverse set of marketing tactics and campaigns over time takes discipline and forethought.

But where I felt this marketing manager was failing her business colleagues was around integrating the content creation, the speech-giving with marketing analytics and tracking data.

I challenge the assertion that you “cannot know” if a speaking engagement has any effect.

How to track conference speeches for marketing impact

Let me make some suggestions:

  • Every conference – offer a free download of something valuable. Create a trackable URL. Cookie the browsers visiting that site.
  • ALSO offer the visitor something even more valuable (not a sales pitch) if they sign up to your database

Both of these create trackable events which (even if 2 years passes) can enable you to demonstrate results.

Any pass-on of URLs to second parties like consultants or colleagues is tracked too.

I use Google Campaign URL builder and also short link services like Bit.ly for this.

Upskill your internal marketing team

When did you last go and get training and invest in your internal marketing team?  I fear many in-house teams do not get the attention they deserve.  Hiring an agency or consultant is not necessarily going to improve the team skills – it delegates marketing activity to outsiders.

What could you do to invest better, to improve your team’s ability to run the strategy as well as the execution, to better understand what the agency / consultant is doing for you, so that they can brief better, to guide the marketing plan better, to adapt and adjust the marketing budget for new tech, for new market conditions (recession?) and above all, to stay in front of the competition?

So challenge yourself, is the marketing you are doing giving you the yield you seek?

Mid-Sized Business Marketing

The power of New Zealand business as an engine for economic growth lies mainly in  mid-sized businesses.  These are under-recognised by many for the power they wield.

Grant Thornton has done a study of the sector  which has some interesting findings.

  • Mid-sized firms are growing faster than large or small (absolute numbers).
  • Most are mature, in B2B industries
  • Job growth is much higher than in other corporations (large or small)
  • They suffer low productivity
  • Capital investment is low (obvs as GT specialises in this type of consultancy)
  • Suffer low international / export aspirations
  • Few get >10% of orders via online sources and most under-utilise digital opportunities

5 solutions for future growth

The recommendations made by GT are rather bland, probably reflecting the diversity of business types in the group and the fact that they want to be paid for custom recommendations.

Here’s what I would add as ways to get your own business started on its future path.

  1. Bring on short-term contractors to assess opportunities and report to the Board
  2. Add Board Members with specific expertise on a short term basis to guide the Board  [and then leave] e.g. cyber-security, digital marketing, B2B procurement online
  3. Budget for pilot projects [and be prepared to walk away]
  4. Hire newly migrated kiwis who can bring overseas experience [leverage them for knowledge, implementation and then don’t worry if they leave]
  5. New Zealand experience in employees is over-rated.  Find people NOT like your current team.  Use them to show you overseas methods / techniques / tools and input to 1 above.

Mid sized business recommendations

Download the report

marketing competitors, competitor positioning,

Why don’t customers buy now?

Today I’m working with a client who is finding it hard to get prospects to buy.

We are working through a list of possible reasons.  My first view is that more advertising / publicity is probably not the reason.  I think that it’s more to do with the offer, the positioning, the brand promise and perceptions of value and immediate need.

Later is an option

Buying now is obviously what the client brand wants.

But for the prospect, why would they?

Deferring risk is part of the prospect’s decision making.  And as marketers we tend to presume that our logic, our world view must prevail.

But the reasons people don’t buy can also be

  • awareness
  • trust
  • world view
  • perceptions about value

We wrote a list of all the reasons someone would not buy this product.  Try it for yourself.

Competitors exist too

Some people will buy from your competitors.  Can you find out why they chose them?  Do you have anecdotes about customers trying another brand and coming back to yours?

Without publishing it, could you assemble anecdotes about your competitors, classify them and produce a rank order of WHY people choose them over you?

Then compare that to your positioning and brand promise.
Where do you really stand out, where are you broadly the same?

That will give your sales team clues….. I call these “golden questions” and they are defined by Don Peppers as questions whose answers tell you a lot more than the question implies.

So, if the customer is really concerned about something…. what do you ask / tell them?
If they are really concerned about price and only price ….what do you ask / tell them?

Today is later

Now is usually better than later.